Baby Bug Out Bags

Baby Bug Out Bags

I am a stay-at-home father. Is that considered a respectable career choice yet. What came with this career choice has been a bit of a surprise. I don’t really have the free time I was expecting, even though for all intents and purpose I am home a lot. When she is awake, we are off to the park, grocery shopping, reading together or visiting a drop-in centre. And every time she goes to bed, it is either a whirlwind of cleaning after her or I am too wiped to do anything constructive. And it is hard to venture outside when she is sleeping since I have to listen out for her – assuming she graces me with a nap. When I am out and about, I have to juggle getting things accomplished with entertaining her, making sure she doesn’t get into trouble and “accidents”. For all these life events, I rely on the diaper bag. Which sounds like it is only filled with diapers and wipes. A diaper bag is so much more. It is a baby bug out bag (Baby BOB), a child survival kit and it is designed around the child in question. No two are alike. When my daughter spends time with my in-laws, the bag goes with her. When we go to the park, it hangs off the handles of the stroller. And only when we are a minute from it, will I leave the bag in the car. Function The diaper bag fulfils all the priorities of a survival kit – only for someone who can’t handle knives, play with fire and is not...
Multifunctional Garbage

Multifunctional Garbage

To me, the term “multifunctional” is synonymous with inefficient. Take the multi-tool for example. I have carried a Leatherman Wave for over a decade. I had languished in my pack on every outdoor adventure without fail, eating up survival kit space while providing a very limited amount of actual benefit. It looks nice. It reminds me of something James Bond would pull out to jury-rig a car. And it has 17 different tools. But everyone is sub par at best. The only function that this multi-tool is good at is opening bottles – and even then, since I learned to open bottles with the back edge of my knife, I never use the multi-tool. The stainless steel knife is too short and stocky for most tasks and is a pain to sharpen. The smaller tools in the handles are hard to pull out, and the pliers loosen up when you use the wire cutting feature too much. And it is an expensive tool at around the $100 mark. The Leatherman Wave multi-tool is just not as good as a purpose built knife. Each part of a multi-tool compromises the other parts. It is not as good at cutting as a cheap Mora knife and a cheap pair of vice grips are far more robust and reliable. Same goes with the sail needle or often cited wool blanket. The sail needle cannot beat a Suunto MC-2 Compass for navigation, especially when calculating a 10 km hike and taking into account error. And the wool blanket will never be as warm as a mummy sleeping bag. Few experts that talk about...