How To Make Dry Laundry Detergent

How To Make Dry Laundry Detergent

It took me a while to take the plunge into making my own laundry detergent. Reason #1 was because I watched a bunch of videos on how to make liquid concentrate. In this style of recipe, you have to boil the soap flakes and other ingredients in a giant pot until everything melts down, separate it out into other 5 gallon containers and then re-hydrate it with even more water. Basically it looked like a pain in the ass to make and from what I saw, took up a huge amount of room, and we are all tight on space. Reason #2 was if it is going to take up all this room and smell up the house while cooking the soapy mixture, my wife was going to be less than enthusiastic about doing something like this again. On a rather recent Survival Punk podcast episode, James (one of the hosts) talked about making a dry detergent mixture during a rainy day. I read his article over, checked out some other sources (as you should always do when embarking on a science experiment) and purchased the rather cheap ingredients at the local discount grocery store. All in all, I spent around $15.00 to $20.00 – the same price as a jug of detergent. Not bad. I have been using the recipe below for around 4 months and I doubt I will go back to the liquid concentrate. It is a huge difference in cost. The recipe below will make 50 mason jars of liquid detergent (100 large loads) in a single mason jar, and I still have most of the boxes of borax,...
Cold Weather Work Gloves

Cold Weather Work Gloves

Out with the old, in with the new. What if instead: out with the new, in with the old? For the last couple of months, I have been testing a pair of Terra Nitrile Dipped Nylon Cold Weather work gloves. I have worn them around the house, out about the city (black gloves can basically go anywhere and no one notices), and as driving gloves (at the moment replacing my Hatch Street Guard gloves which are looking a little worse for wear). The Terra work gloves are a part of the new trend of using nitrile-dipped technology to “waterproof” your hands against the nasty wet stuff you deal with on a regular basis. And they do keep water and most muck out, provided that it doesn’t go much farther than your knuckles. Their rough grippy outer shell is great for dealing with recycling and garbage, and as with this pair of cold weather gloves, they are snow proof. But they are far from perfect. Basically, due to the waterproofing latex-esque layer of paint that keeps stuff out, they also keep moisture in. Even while driving, once the heater in the car kicks in at -30, they start to get… moist. Any real activity that involves any physical labour, the gloves actually get colder. This is because as you start to sweat (which is your body’s way of maintaining a consistent internal temperature of 37°C / 98.5°F when faced with a rising internal temperature), the water collects right against your skin and it conducts heat 25 times faster than when your hands are dry (see Survival Course, Shelter). So unless you...