WROL Hearsay

WROL Hearsay

Above image is a stock gas mask photo for effect. People are full of shit. I can’t tell you the number of articles, YouTube videos and podcasts where people speculate on what is going to happen in a WROL (Without Rule Of Law) situation. How people are going to barter, how there are going to be roving bands of outlaws, how the government is going to sweep in and take their stuff. How do they know? They don’t. Almost every one of them is not disaster management specialist. Few of them have even been in a collapse environment (save deployed military personal), and the majority of their information is made up.  How The Web Works So why do they do that? Well, if you don’t know how the web works, you need content. Real content is hard to come by. It takes time to research, interview, sort and then you maybe have a single article that took you a month to create. There is a reason that a newspaper has many, many people working on stories – because it takes time, money and effort to find factual information (if they are interested in this).  In the age of the web, if you have a website or channel, or podcast, you need hits – which means more and more content. And there are two ways that people get hits: Gear Reviews – especially the new and shiny stuff Contentious opinion If you talk about contentious gear, then you have hit the motherload. All I have to do is mention the Tom Brown Jr. Tracker T1 knife (ad a link for...
Winter Pack Sled Build

Winter Pack Sled Build

In 2004, my friends and I set out to conquer the winter wilderness. For years, we used a cabin deep in the woods as our three season destination. But never in the winter – we worried about the cold, but also, the logistics. How do you get 3 guys and their stuff miles into the woods in knee deep snow, assuming the worst terrain and weather? While sitting around drinking beers in my friend’s basement, I remembered an image from an old Boy Scout Field Guide. It showed three Scouts pulling a wood toboggan through the woods. They looked like they were enjoying themselves and it looked easy enough. What they failed to illustrate was anything greater than flat terrain, and how they got there in the first place. Back in the day, I only had access to a car, not a truck. So everything we decided to bring went in cardboard boxes (burnable?) and our cheap Canadian Tire wood toboggan went from the trunk and into the back seat. When we got to the trail, everything was dumped out of the car onto the cold snow. Almost immediately we were chilled and we stood around discussing optimal placement of the boxes and how we would lash everything together. We decided to pile the cardboard boxes onto a tarp on top of the toboggan and then lashed the whole contraption together with piss-poor knot tying. We used a long length of rope that I had on hand with caribeaners on either end, and a 1 1/2” belt harness that had 2 d-rings held between sliders. I brought a pair of...